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Ako na dobrý spánok. 15 podcastov zhrnutých do 1 článku

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Ide o (platené) zhrnutie 15 podcastov do 1 článku. Publikujem s uvedením autora podcastnotes.com.

Products to Improve Your Sleep

  • The chiliPAD is a mattress topper that circulates temperature-controlled water (varying between 55-110 °F), allowing you to optimize your sleep environment
    • For 25% off the chiliPAD, use the code “Podcastnotes25” at checkout
  • The OOLER is Chili’s follow-up product. The main difference? It’s app-controlled, allowing you to set a schedule that changes the temperature throughout the night.
    • For 20% off the OOLER, use the code “PNooler” at checkout
  • Taking CBD before bed can improve sleep
    • Podcast Notes Trusted CBD: Use the code “PODCASTVIBES” for 15% off at checkout. Why do we trust Sabaidee? It’s 100% organic, American-made, and third-party tested (with results transparently posted on their site) to ensure nothing unwanted is mixed in.
  • Use a weighted blanket. We like the Manta. It’s machine washable, quilted for even weight distribution, and Oeko-Tex certified to ensure the products are free from harmful chemicals
  • Excess blue light exposure from phones, TVs, and computer screens inhibits melatonin secretion. There are a few ways to limit late-night exposure to blue light:
  • Supplement recommendations:
    • You might consider taking magnesium threonate and L-theanine before bed, both of which have a calming effect
    • Try taking 3-5 mg of melatonin if you’re having trouble winding down or looking to reset your internal clock post-travel
    • Try SOM (use the code “podcastnotes” for 10% off at checkout), a “sleep stack” to maximize sleep onset and quality, containing magnesium, GABA, l-theanine, vitamin B6, and melatonin
  • We all know sleeping in a dark environment is hugely beneficial, but what if you can’t get your room as dark as you want? Use the Manta Sleep Mask (use the code “PODCASTNOTES15” for 15% off).
  • Can’t sleep because of honking cars or motorbikes? Tim Ferriss recommends Mack’s Pillow Soft Silicone Earplugs.
  • If you’re the type that needs white noise to get some shut-eye, give Manta’s White Noise Machine a try.
  • Are you stressed out? Can’t relax? Use a foam roller before bed. The RumbleRoller is perfect for this. Just roll out your quads 10-15 minutes before hitting the hay, and you’ll be out like a light. Doing so activates the parasympathetic nervous system—this is what relaxes us.
  • The Oura Ring is hands-down the best sleep-tracker on the market

On to the latest and greatest from podcast land:

Can CBD enhance sleep?

  • Yes! Specifically, CBD seems to enhance the amount of time it takes to fall asleep. It also acts to decrease anxiety, which further improves sleep quality.
  • That said, you need to take a lot. Most of the research surrounding CBD’s sleep-enhancement properties push closer to a dose of ~100-200 mg (a typical dose is ~10 mg).
  • Here’s a great brand of CBD we recommend at Podcast Notes. Use the code “PODCASTVIBES” for 15% off at checkout. Why do we trust Sabaidee? It’s 100% organic, American-made, and third-party tested (with results transparently posted on their site) to ensure nothing unwanted is mixed in.

The Science of Temperature and Sleep

  • First, some facts:
    • Your brain needs to drop its temperature 2-3 °F to sleep
    • The science is clear: all things considered,the colder your room (up to a point, of course), the better your sleep qualityand more deep sleep you get
    • You get most of your deep sleep during the first half of the night (when your body temperature should be cooling down)
    • In the morning, sleep cycles tend to be heavier on REM sleep (this coincides with your body temperature rising)
  • But, we have two problems:
    • Mattresses are a heat sink—they cause our body temperature to rise throughout the night when it should be decreasing
    • Indoor, temperature-controlled environments have no natural temperature fluctuations—there’s nothing to signal the body that it’s time to go to sleep. For many people that have insomnia, their circadian rhythm (a drop in core body temperature) isn’t happening as it should when it comes time for bed.
  • What’s the solution? Well, for one, you could blast your AC all year round, but if that’s not your cup of tea, here’s what we recommend:
    • Use a chiliPAD, a mattress topper that circulates temperature-controlled water (varying between 55-110 °F), allowing you to optimize your sleep environment
      • How does it work?
        • Water flows through the medical-grade silicone tubes of the mattress pad and is heated/cooled using thermoelectric technology
      • Why does the chiliPad work?
        • Even if you set your bedroom temperature to 68 °F, once you get in bed and cover yourself with a blanket, you create a 98 °F human heat engine
      • Okay, you’re sold. For 25% off the chiliPAD, use the code “Podcastnotes25” at checkout.
    • Or try the OOLER, Chili’s follow-up product. The main difference? It’s app-controlled, allowing you to set a schedule that changes the temperature throughout the night.
      • It’s a good idea to schedule the OOLER to:
        • Cool down as you drift off to sleep (this aids deep sleep)
        • Warm up as it gets closer to your wake up time (this mimics the natural rise in your body temperature during the morning hours, aiding REM sleep)
      • For 20% off the OOLER, use the code “PNooler” at checkout

The Science of Light & Sleep

  • Let’s start with the morning:
    • One of the absolute best things you can do for your circadian rhythm is to get some early-morning light exposure. So, go outside! Max Lugavere’s recommendation: try to get 30 minutes of 1,000 lux intensity light before noon each day. Fun fact: even on a cloudy day, the outside environment’s light > 1,000 lux.
  • What about at night?
    • Once the sun goes down, your main job is to limit exposure to artificial blue light, which inhibits melatonin secretion. Remember: melatonin is the hormone that tells your body its time for bed.
  • There are a few ways to limit late-night exposure to blue light:

Why You Should Limit Late-Night Food Intake

  • According to Dr. Satchin Panda, sleep deprivation, in combination with late-night eating, is quite problematic. Here’s why:
    • While sleeping, we produce growth hormone, which helps repair damaged cells. When we’re sleep-deprived, less of this growth hormone is present. Also, when we eat late at night, our stomach works well past the time we fall asleep to digest the food (and when it’s digesting food, it can’t repair itself).
    • All of the above leads to accumulated damage in the gut, When the gut lining is damaged, allergy-causing food particles or disease-causing bacteria enter the bloodstream, leading to more inflammation (and MANY chronic diseases, have their root in increased inflammation).
  • Dr. Matthew Walker’s advice:
    • Aim to stop eating ~3 hours before bed
    • Further: avoid eating simple carbs too close to bedtime as they tend to raise your core body temperature. Remember: to fall asleep, you need to drop your core body temperature by 2-3 °F.
    • If you need to eat before bed, lean more towards higher protein meals
  • Max Lugavere also advises limiting food consumption post-sundown
    • Reason #1: We’re most insulin sensitive during the day (and our metabolisms are faster)
    • Reason #2: Circadian rhythm disruption (achieved by eating a late-night meal) can alter the hormones that affect the calories out side of the calories in/calories out equation (AKA, the body burns fewer calories from a meal when it’s consumed late at night)
    • Reason #3: Late-night eating suppresses leptin levels (the satiety hormone) and raises next-day ghrelin levels (the hormone that signals hunger)

Sleep Cycles, Explained

  • The stages of sleep:
    • Non-REM (N-REM)Stage 1, 2, 3, and 4
      • Stages 1 and 2 are lighter; stages 3 and 4 are the deepest/most restorative
    • REM (rapid eye movement)
  • Here’s what a typical 90-minute sleep cycle looks like:
    • When you’re lying in bed with your eyes closed, the back of the brain goes into an “alpha rhythm” and starts to settle down
      • (The back part of the brain stops processing the outside world and slows the frequency of its brain waves—from 50 cycles/second to 10 cycles/second)
    • As you begin to fall asleep, your eyeballs start to roll in your sockets (called “slow-rolling eye movements”)
    • Then, you enter Stage 1 and 2 N-REM sleep
      • In Stage 1, alpha brain waves are diminished, and theta brain waves start to appear
      • In Stage 2, the frequency of brain waves (now all theta) is ~6-7 cycles/second. The amplitude of the waves also increases.
    • After 20 minutes, you enter into Stage 3 and 4 N-REM sleep (deep sleep)
      • At this point, the brain’s waves (now delta waves) are more slow/chant-like (1-2 cycles/second) with large amplitudes
    • After about 70 minutes, you fall back into Stage 2, and then transfer into REM sleep
    • Finally, you fall back into Stage 1, completing the 90-minute cycle
  • As the night goes on…
    • In the first half, the majority of your 90-minute sleep cycles are comprised of deep N-REM sleep and little REM sleep
    • In the second half, the majority of your sleep cycles are comprised more of REM sleep, and almost no deep sleep
      • THIS IS WHY YOU CAN’T JUST SLEEP 5-6 HOURS/NIGHT—YOU MISS OUT ON A TON (ALMOST ALL) OF YOUR REM SLEEP

Sleep Facts

  • 1 out of 2 American adults is trying to survive on 6 hours of sleep or less during the week
  • The average American adult is sleeping 6 hours and 31 minutes during the week (it used to be 7.9 hours in 1942)
  • About 70% of teen parents believe their teen is getting enough sleep
    • But only 11% of teens are actually getting the sleep they need
  • Every 30 seconds, there is a car accident linked to lack of sleep
    • Drowsy driving kills more people on the roads than alcohol or drugs combined

Do we really need 8 hours of sleep?

  • Based on evidence from over 100,000 studies, the number of people who can survive on 5 hours of sleep or less, without showing any impairment, rounded to a whole number and expressed as a percentage of the population…is 0
    • There’s a genetic abnormality in the DEC gene, which allows people to sleep around 5.5-6 hours, without any impairment
      • The genetic defect promotes wakefulness chemistry in the brain
      • There is a small fraction of <1% of the population, that has this gene abnormality – You are more likely to be struck by lightning in your lifetime (odds of 1/12,500) than you are to have this genetic abnormality

The Circadian Rhythm

  • We all have a “chronotype” – a natural timing tendency for when you want to be awake, and when you want to be asleep
    • Some people are “night owls”, others are “morning larks”
    • It’s important to realize that your chronotype is not a choice
      • There are genes that dictate whether or not you’re a night/morning person
      • So some good news! – It’s not your fault if you can’t function effectively at 7 AM

A Huge List of What Happens When You Don’t Get Enough Sleep

  • In regards to physical performance:
    • If you’re getting 6 hours of sleep or less, your time to physical exhaustion drops by up to 30%
    • Lactic acid builds up quicker
    • The ability of your lungs to expire carbon dioxide and inhale oxygen decreases
    • The less sleep you have, the lower your peak muscular strength, the lower your vertical jump height, and the lower your peak running speed
    • You have a higher risk of injury
      • Why? – Your stability muscles fail earlier when not getting enough sleep
      • One study showed a 60% increase in the probability of injury, comparing people who get 9 hours of sleep a night, to those who get 5
  • In regards to mental performance:
    • Once you get below 7 hours of sleep, scientists can measure impairments in the brain
    • With a lack of REM sleep, you’re more prone to mental health issues (like depression, anxiety, and suicidality)
  • With less sleep, leptin gets suppressed, and ghrelin gets ramped up
    • Leptin is the body’s main satiety hormone. It tells our brains we’re full. Ghrelin does the opposite. It’s the hunger hormone.
    • People sleeping 4-5 hours a night will on average eat 200-300 extra calories each day (this equates to 70,000 extra calories each year, which translates into 10-15 lbs. of extra body mass)
  • Insufficient sleep is the most significant lifestyle factor for determining whether or not you’ll develop Alzheimer’s Disease
    • Our brain detoxifies during sleep through activation of the glymphatic system. It’s about 10x more active when we sleep compared to when we’re awake.
      • A cool tidbit – When we sleep, our brain cells shrink to about 60% of their normal size, making more room for detoxification.
      • One of those toxins cleared by the glymphatic system during sleep is beta amyloid – which is responsible for the underlying mechanism of Alzheimer’s Disease
      • So the less you sleep – the more this plaque builds up
  • Impact on driving:
    • With just 6 hours of sleep, you’re 33% more likely to get into a traffic accident
    • After 20 hours of being awake, you are as physically and cognitively impaired as you would be if you were legally drunk
  • Men who sleep 5-6 hours a night will have a level of testosterone 6-10 years their senior
  • One study sleep-deprived individuals for one night (to 4 hours of sleep) – they experienced a 70% reduction in critical anti-cancer-fighting cells (natural killer cells)
  • A lack of sleep and medicine:
    • Residents working a 30-hour shift are 460% more likely to make diagnostic errors in the intensive care unit, relative to when they’re working 16 hours
    • If you have surgery, you should ask your surgeon how much sleep they’ve had in the last 24 hours
      • If they’ve had 6 hours of sleep or less – you have a 170% increased risk of a major surgical error
    • 1 in 5 medical residents will make an error due to insufficient sleep
    • 1 in 20 medical residents will kill a patient due to a fatigue-related error
  • The shorter your sleep, the shorter your life – a lack of sleep predicts all-cause mortality
    • If you’re regularly getting 5 hours of sleep or less, you have a 65% increased risk of dying at any moment in time, relative to people getting 8 hours of sleep or more
    • “Every disease that’s killing us in the developed world, now has a causal link to insufficient sleep“ – Dr. Matthew Walker
      • This list includes – Cancer, Alzheimer’s Disease, Stroke, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, Obesity, Depression, and Suicide
  • Our brain’s ability to decode the emotions of other people goes down
    • With a full 8 hours of sleep, you have a nicely tuned ability for picking up and discriminating subtle emotions
    • With sleep deprivation, or specifically a lack of REM sleep, this ability becomes blunted
    • Why does this happen?
      • With sleep deprivation, there’s reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex
      • The prefrontal cortex is responsible for decision making, distinguishing between right/wrong, and social/emotional control
  • Stress hormones (like cortisol) get elevated
    • One of the adverse side effects of cortisol is that it can break down muscle tissue for sugar
  • When you’re sleep-deprived, you have a lowered desire for social proximity and social interaction (you’re also more likely to appear as a “lonely person”)
  • Relative to a person with a full night’s sleep, the amygdala (the emotional part of the brain) is 60% more reactive under conditions of a lack of sleep
    • On top of that, sleep deprivation shuts down the prefrontal cortex’s communication with the amygdala (the prefrontal cortex acts as a brake on the gas pedal of your emotions)

Sleep, Adenosine, and Caffeine

  • Adenosine
    • From the moment you wake up, adenosine starts to build up in the brain, and the more it builds up, the sleepier you feel
    • After 16 hours of the accumulation of adenosine, you should feel sleepy enough to fall asleep relatively easily, and stay asleep throughout the night
    • During the deep stages of sleep, the brain clears out the adenosine
  • Caffeine
    • Caffeine latches on to adenosine receptors, blocking the sleepiness signal
      • It’s like the mute button on your remote – it mutes the adenosine signal
      • While the caffeine is working its magic, the brain is still building up adenosine
        • So by the time the effect of the caffeine has worn off, you’ll have additional sleep pressure from that adenosine build-up (otherwise known as a caffeine crash)
  • Caffeine has a half-life of 6-7 hours, so after 5-6 hours of drinking a cup of coffee, half the caffeine is still in your system
    • It has a quarter-life of 12 hours – So if you have a cup of coffee around noon, 1/4 of the caffeine is still circulating around your brain at midnight
      • This is the equivalent of drinking a quarter cup of coffee right before bed
  • Caffeine is thermogenic (it increases your core body temperature) – this makes you more alert
    • So even a non-caffeinated hot drink in the morning, will help wake you up (try high-quality decaf coffee (swiss water method, you don’t know want to see the chemicals they put in cheap decaf)
      • In order for the body to “wake up” – its core temperature has to rise
      • So, a half hour before you want to wake up, it might be a good idea to set your thermostat to rise by a few degrees

Shift Work

  • The link between a lack of sleep and cancer is now so strong, that recently the World Health Organization decided to classify any form of nighttime shift work as a probable carcinogen
  • One study showed that nurses doing shift work (working overnight) have a 30% increased risk of developing breast cancer
    • All it takes is 2-3 days a week of working overnights for this risk to develop
  • Shift workers have higher rates of obesity, diabetes, and cancer

Some Beneficial Things That Happen During Sleep

  • Our brain replays memory sequences we learn while awake, but ~20x faster
    • “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice with a night of sleep makes perfect.” – Dr. Matthew Walker
    • Sleep after learning will essentially hit the “save button” on those memories, so you won’t forget them
    • You come back the next day and you’re 20-30% better at your skilled performance, compared to the end of your practice session the day before
  • Dream sleep is the only time during the 24 hour period, that the brain stops producing a stress-related chemical called noradrenaline (aka norepinephrine)
    • During this time, the emotional and memory centers of the brain, are ~30% more active than when you’re awake
    • What does this all mean? – The brain is reactivating and reprocessing the emotional experiences of the prior day, in a neurochemical state that is “safe”, devoid of any stress neurochemistry
      • So when you wake up, you remember the emotional memories, but you’re left with a memory of an emotional event, that is no longer itself, emotional
      • In a sense then, dreaming is essentially divorcing the emotion from the memory
  • During dream sleep, we take old information, and combine it with new information we’ve learned, and form new connections/associations
    • During deep sleep, we cement individual memories
    • REM sleep then takes those memories, and starts to collide them with the back catalog of information that you’ve built up – the new memories find connections and associations, allowing you to find remarkable insights for previously impenetrable problems
    • That’s why you’re told to “sleep on it”
    • For this reason, we might often find new solutions to previously unsolvable problems after a good sleep

How to Beat Jet Lag

  • Assuming you’re taking a long transatlantic flight (like from SF to London)…
    • Sleep only during the first half of the flight, and stay awake during the second half, as well as throughout the following day when you arrive
      • Try to give yourself at least 14 hours of being awake, from the time you wake up halfway through the flight, to the time you want to go to sleep in the new time zone (so you have time to build up enough adenosine)
    • Change your watch/phone time to the new time zone before your flight takes off to get yourself in the new mindset
    • Avoid alcohol and caffeine on the flight – both will make it harder for your 24-hour clock to adjust to the new time zone
    • Get at least 30 minutes of natural daylight before 10 AM in the new time zone – do NOT wear sunglasses, you need the light
    • Do some light exercise before midday in the new time zone – even a 20-minute walk
    • As soon as you land, start eating on the new time zone schedule
    • Supplement with melatonin to help “reset” your clock (see below)
  • Your body clock resets by about an hour each day that you’re in the new time zone

Melatonin

  • It’s a hormone that rises at night. It tells your body it’s night time, and that it’s time to sleep
  • Use it strategically – You can fool your body into thinking it’s night time, enabling you to get an edge up on jet lag.
    • You don’t need to supplement with much though– only 0.5-2 mg
      • By taking 5-10 mg, your system starts to adapt, and becomes intolerant to the melatonin
      • Take it 45 minutes before your desired bedtime
  • Once you’re stable in a new time zone, melatonin doesn’t seem to be advantageous towards sleep – it’s much more of a placebo effect

Sleep and Evolution

  • “From an evolutionary standpoint, think about sleep. It is the most idiotic of all things. When you’re asleep, you’re not finding a mate, you’re not finding food, you’re not reproducing, and you’re not caring for your young. You are vulnerable to harm. Sleep should have been strongly selected against in the course of evolution. The fact that it has persisted in every species that we’ve studied to date, means that if sleep doesn’t serve an absolutely vital function, it’s the biggest mistake the evolutionary process ever made.” – Dr. Matthew Walker
  • Think about sleep on an evolutionary level
    • Going to sleep for 7-8 hours leaves us so vulnerable to attack
    • If sleep was something that wasn’t needed, we would have developed the ability to function without it

Sleep and Early School Start Times

  • Studies have found that when school start times are delayed, academic performance increases, behavioral problems decrease, psychiatric issues decrease, and the life expectancy of students increases
    • Why does life expectancy increase? The leading cause of death among adolescent teens is road traffic accidents – a major cause of which is a lack of sleep
  • One study in Wyoming tracked a school who delayed their start time from 7:30 AM to 8:55 AM
    • They showed a 70% reduction in road traffic accidents for kids ages 16-18
  • For a 7:30 AM start time, some school buses will starting picking kids up around 5:30-6 AM, meaning some kids have to wake up as early as 5 AM
    • Waking up at 7:30 AM, for a teenager, is the equivalent of an adult waking up at 4:30 or 3:30 in the morning
      • During adolescence, you become more night owlish – your chronotype starts to move forward in time
  • One school shifted start times from 7:25 AM to 8:30 AM, and average SAT scores rose 212 points
  • “If our goal, as educators, truly is to educate and not risk lives in the process, then we are failing our children in the most spectacular manner, in this incessant model of early school start times” – Dr. Matthew Walker

Some Great Quotes About Sleep

  • “If you’re not sleeping, you’re not healing” – Shawn Stevenson
  • “Almost all of us are chronically underslept, and it’s not a badge of honor that we should be wearing. It’s hurting us in our creative pursuits, in our work, and the way we relate to others.” – Jordan Harbinger
  • “Sleep is the greatest legal performance-enhancing drug that most people are probably neglecting” – Dr. Matthew Walker
  • “Your sleep quality is potentially a bigger influence on your overall health, your physical appearance, and your biomarkers than your nutrition and exercise” – Shawn Stevenson
  • “The less and less you sleep, the higher and higher your mortality risk… and the higher your risk for most of the diseases killing us in the developing world” – Dr. Matthew Walker
  • “A great night of sleep starts the moment you wake up in the morning” – Shawn Stevenson
  • “Most tissue and physiological systems in the body, as well as most operations of the mind, are powerfully enhanced with sleep, and quite demonstrably impaired when we don’t get enough” – Dr. Matthew Walk
  • “Human beings are the only species that deprive themselves of sleep, for no apparent gain” – Dr. Matthew Walker
  • “You don’t know you’re sleep-deprived when you’re sleep-deprived” – Dr. Matthew Walker
  • “It makes me think about the term ‘midnight’ and what it actually means. Midnight actually means ‘middle of the night,’ and it is when you let yourself sleep in harmony with the natural edict. But for must of us, that’s the time when we send our last tweet or check our email for the last time.” – Dr. Matthew Walker

How to Improve Your Sleep Quality, and Boost the Speed at Which You Fall Asleep

  • From these Podcast Notes, what’s the MOST IMPORTANT piece of sleep advice sleep expert Dr. Matthew Walker, author of Why We Sleep, can give?
    • Go to sleep and wake up at the same times every day – regularity is key
  • Here’s some advice from Shawn Stevenson, author of Sleep Smarter: 21 Essential Strategies to Sleep Your Way to A Better Body, Better Health, and Bigger Success, discussed in these Podcast Notes
    • Get some sun exposure early in the day (from 8-10 AM, even 5-10 minutes is good)
      • Sun exposure increases cortisol levels
        • A normal cortisol rhythm is as follows – it peaks in the morning and drops in the evening
        • Cortisol helps jump start our body
        • Raised cortisol levels in the morning, lower cortisol levels at night (this is good)
          • Why? – Cortisol and melatonin have an inverse relationship (remember melatonin rises at night)
          • If cortisol is elevated later on in the way, it can suppress melatonin
      • Sun exposure increases serotonin production
        • Serotonin is a precursor for melatonin
      • Even on a cloudy day, you can get enough light to anchor your body’s circadian rhythm, and help your sleep
    • Get some exercise early on in the day – even 5 minutes is enough (a jog, yoga, a power walk – anything to get your body moving)
      • Morning exercisers have been found to get more deep sleep, have more efficient sleep cycles, sleep longer, and have a higher drop in blood pressure at night
        • This drop in blood pressure is correlated with relaxation
  • Some tips from Dr. Matthew Walker from these Podcast Notes:
    • One hour of iPhone use will delay the onset of melatonin production by about 3 hours (Your peak melatonin levels will also be 50% less) – so stay off your phone near bed time
      • Dr. Walker also recommends turning off most of the lights in your house at night 2-3 hours before bed so your melatonin levels can rise
    • Keep your room as cold as you can tolerate – Your brain needs to drop its temperature 2-3 °F in order to sleep
    • Either go to sleep with socks and gloves on, or take a warm bath right before bed…why?
      • The socks and gloves warm your hands and feet – this moves blood away from your core out to the surface, which helps drop your core body temperature (this helps you fall asleep quicker)
      • With a warm bath, you get vasodilation (rosy cheeks, red skin) and all of the blood rushes to the surface – when you get out, you have a massive dump of heat from the body and your core body temperature plummets
  • A few tips from Tim Ferriss, as discussed in these Podcast Notes:
    • Try taking 3-5mg of melatonin if you’re having trouble winding down, or looking to reset your clock after travel, late nights, etc.
      • Note – Be careful of relying on any pill to help you sleep every night, or you risk becoming dependent on it
    • Go to sleep by 11PM to mitigate depressive/anxious symptoms
    • Supplements that might help – NAC (this can raise glutathione levels, which aids in detoxification) and lithium orotate
    • Check out these cool products:
    • Try the famous The Tim Ferriss Nighttime Cocktail – this works wonders, if you don’t want to add honey, just go with Yogi Bedtime Tea
    • Tim has also suggested (and it worked for me) reading fiction before bed. This helps calm the mind and turn off our problem-solving brains. A few favorites include:
  • Here are a few tips from famed biohacker Serge Faguet, from these Podcast Notes
    • Sex boosts the amount of time you spend in deep sleep
    • Wear blue light blocking glasses (use the code “PodcastNotes10” for 10% off at checkout) a few hours before going to bed – excess blue light exposure (from phones, TVs, and computer screens prevents melatonin levels from rising
    • You have to sleep at the same time every night. If you shift your sleep by a few hours, you’re going to miss certain stages.
    • Caffeine has a half-life of 5-6 hours, so 5-6 hours after drinking a cup of coffee, half of the caffeine will still be in your system, hindering your sleep – best to avoid it after 12 PM
    • And most shockingly, Serge has noticed even half a glass of wine disrupts his deep sleep via his Oura Ring – so avoid alcohol unless it’s a special occasion
      • Purchase a ring using our link for a $50 discount applied at checkout
    • Check out the Chilipad. (Use code PodcastNotes25 for 25% off a ChiliPad or PNooler for 20% off an Ooler) – a recommendation Serge, Tim Ferriss, and many of his guests
  • What else do top performers use to help them get some shut-eye? Kelly Starrett and Amelia Boone recommend foam rolling right before bed:
    • The RumbleRoller is perfect for this – roll out your quads 10-15 minutes before hitting the hay and you’ll be out like a light. Why does this work? It activates the parasympathetic nervous system – this is what relaxes us.
    • Alternatively, you could use a deep-tissue massage ball, this works great for the stomach/gut area
  • Here are some supplement recommendations from legendary strength coach, Charles Poliquin:
  • And lastly, a Podcast Notes recommendation:
    • Try SOM 
      • What is it?
        • A “Sleep Stack” to maximize sleep onset and quality
      • What’s in it?
        • Magnesium: Many people lack enough magnesium which is key for producing melatonin naturally
        • L-Theanine: Found in green tea and associated with calming effects
        • GABA: Produced by your body and associated with calming brain activity and relaxation
        • Vitamin B-6: Co-factor for natural melatonin production
        • Melatonin: Once the other ingredients help you get calm and relaxed, this helps supplement your body’s natural levels to help you take the final step into sweet, sweet slumber
    • Want SOM (haha)? Use the code “podcastnotes” for 10% off at checkout